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  • Is it me or Isn't it me?

    “It is you. Not everyone has your diagnosis.”

    We go back and forth in the mental health community about language all the time, how it can hurt, how labels matter (or don’t for some). One infallible truth however is that words do hurt and we can’t take them back. I did an exercise with my children on the day prior to school starting to demonstrate this very point, taking a tube of Aim toothpaste, squeezing the entire tube onto a plate. I asked the kids if they thought they could get the toothpaste back in the tube exactly as it been previously. They laughed and told me “no way!” We reviewed that once words are out there, you cannot put them and some people will never be the same. We took the time to talk about being kind, thoughtful citizens of the school community. I do not know three days into the school how long the toothpaste experiment will last, but we are working on it.

    “It is you. Not everyone has your diagnosis." 

    Not everyone has my diagnosis. It’s true. As of 2014, there are an estimated 5.3 million adults in the United States with bipolar disorder. This statistic does not differentiate between bipolar 1 and 2 disorder. (www.treatmentadvocacycenter.org/resources/briefing-papers-and-fact-sheets/159/463)

    I somehow do not believe words like this can be slung so carelessly at someone however in my situation. Those eight words leave someone, including me, with the impression that my disorder and my symptoms are my fault. I’m 41 years old. I know when I am being a jerk for the sake of being a jerk. I also know when I feel utterly helpless and cannot control my swirling tornado of emotion, thought and word due to a mood episode and resurgence of symptoms. Thus begging the question, is it really me?

    There is nothing I dislike more than my diagnosis and the impact it will wreak on my daily life from time to time. There is nothing worse than hearing your child ask you where Mommy went because “this isn’t my Mommy right now” when you are in a manic rage. It stops you in your tracks, kicks you in the stomach and renders one unable to breathe. It hurts because I didn’t ask for this. I did not ask to become ill. My children didn’t ask for an ill parent either. All of us (the kids and myself) asked for love and some understanding of our behaviors. The kids, because they are immature with developing brains and will do obnoxious things at times. Me, because I cannot achieve remission again without love, patience, time and a solid treatment team.

    “It is you. Not everyone has your diagnosis.”

    Not everyone has my diagnosis, and the things I CAN control are simple: putting down the phone and staying away from social media when it’s bothersome to me and liable to set me off. Sitting down every single night with the kids for dinner. Instituting family time every single night regardless of how tired I am. Bedtime snuggles and hugs. I can show my kids how much Mommy is always there, even when my brain is misbehaving, neurotransmitters have run amok and makes it physically impossible.

    I can’t put the toothpaste back in either. All I can do is work as hard as possible every day to make sure I never squeeze it out in the first place.