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guilt
  • Summer Meltdowns, Loss of Control and Missing the Hospital

    Today was one of those days. It’s been coming for a while. The type of day where I recognize my mental health is in a precarious state due to many circumstances I have zero control over and I’m all at once slowly and rapidly losing my shit to the point I miss the hospital. I want the hospital. I meet zero criteria for the hospital, but the hospital is controlled, with rhythms and routines and predictability. My life presently is not. My brain and my body are seeking it in any way possible.

    I’m not sure when I began to recognize the tides were turning. Was it when my two “best” friends turned on me inexplicably and iced me out without word? Perhaps. That wound is still bleeding from lack of understanding and closure. There are three sides to the truth. All I know is my truth is I was always kind, always there when asked, willing to lend a hand when needed, there for every child birthday party or major event invited. I am not perfect, so sometimes I was needy with my mental illness and needing someone to listen at perhaps inconvenient times. Or just needy. Maybe that’s what did it. I’ll never know. I do know that my children’s birthday party is not prioritized the way I would and one person was supposed to have a major role in the surprise twist to my children’s birthday party. But not anymore, I think they actually forgot.  BOTTOM LINE IS: take all that away, my heart hurts, I still lack closure and a major portion of my mental health support system is gone. Poof. Just like that.

    I did learn I had another support system around me, subtler, less in your face but equally precious. One that I’m grateful this ‘ice out” has given me the opportunity to grow and blossom, though not healing the wound any less. 

    Perhaps the tides were turning when we grew more and more suspicious with the behavior of one of our children. Despite extensive evaluations, our guts kept telling us it was something more than what every doctor had told us. We kept watching and tracking and adding up symptoms. No sleep. Limited food intake. Irritable aggression. Going on for over a week. My faulty genetics being passed down the line and parental guilt kicking in as I never wanted to pass this wretched disease onto one the boys. It has been and always will be my worst nightmare and my worst day as a mother: diagnosis day for my son. 

    I already feel a bit like a parental pariah with his other diagnoses, and now to add this to the pile. I can’t publicly advocate for him, loud and proud the way I do for myself. He has to understand his disorder first. Then, when he’s older, it will be his story to tell. In the meantime I need to figure out to fill up my fuel tanks for puberty for this will be a loathsome combination.

    Perhaps the tides began to turn when I did publicly advocate for my children. One in particular was subject to racial slurs two years in a row by classmates and as a family we took it public to bring about community awareness and change. Being a maven and fomenting change is exhausting and uncomfortable at times while being exhilarating at it’s best. I am confident not everyone is on board with my loud message of preaching diversity be it skin tone, mental health, or being neurotypical/atypical.

    Then we have my grade in my current class for my doctoral program. I am used to being a very high achiever. I graduated UVA with masters summa cum laude. To get punched around in a doctoral level class and be one point below a passing grade is humbling. It’s not reflective of the hours of work I put in each week and my capabilities as a student. It wears on my psyche week after week after week.

    I needed to ugly cry today. I needed to get it out. I needed to ask my husband to hospitalize me. I needed to hear from him that it wasn’t the right thing to do, that I have better choices (and days) ahead of me whether I have the ability to recognize it or not. Right now, I need stability, routine, calm, and peace. I need the chaos, lack of control, zero predictability and no sense of routine to stop. Most of all, I need to my support system is there when I need it.

  • Children, Resiliency and Mental Illness in the Family Unit

    I was away presenting at a nursing conference last week. I was discussing the provider as a patient in the context of both serious mental illness and the need to bring nursing practice back to the basics. If we, as providers, focused on the core of what we do as nurses, creating a consistent therapeutic milieu in interaction with both patients and colleagues alike, it will make it easier for colleagues to seek assistance when they need it. Essentially allowing the provider, the “hidden patient” if you will, to feel safe enough to be provider one day and patient the next. 

    I used my story as a case study named Carly interwoven throughout the presentation. At the conclusion we discussed her remission and I did choose to share that her story was actually that of my own. While I had hoped the question and answer session would be more of conversation regarding how we can focus on these “hidden patients”, I understand the audience seeking more history and questions regarding the case study presented. 

    The question I struggled with the most was how much support my kids had throughout the process and the impact my disorder had had on them. I answered truthfully in that they have received a tremendous amount of care and support from husband and were protected from my illness. I shared that they are incredibly resilient little guys. 

    The truth is there is a lot in what I also did not say. They are getting older. My husband and I won’t always be able to protect them. I live with so much guilt sometimes over having children to begin with. Which is ridiculous when you think about it, since my symptoms and diagnosis came following my final pregnancy. We were done having children at that point. No one had that kind of foresight and if they did, they failed to share it with us. I have guilt because of social media keyboard cowboys who from time to time have taken to telling me via this blog that people with bipolar disorder shouldn’t be parents. Fortunately they have not been as cruel to me as they have to other bloggers I know.  I have guilt because I am not always the type of mother I envisioned I would be when I first learned I would be having my oldest. I have guilt because I think I live in a perpetual state of role strain regarding the family unit. 

    My children will eventually start to ask questions about why I might be isolating. They might start to ask questions about why I am excessively irritable. They already fail to understand my noise sensitivity, which does affect them. Have you ever tried to explain to elementary school boys that they are too loud? Successfully getting them to lower volume is an Olympic feat.

    My oldest has already started to explore basic principles of neurobiology and mental illness to “better understand you, Mommy” as he puts it. He put together a PowerPoint presentation on this topic, presented to his second grade class in May 2016, which caught the attention of the International Bipolar Foundation. I didn’t discuss that in answering the question of the impact my disorder has had on the children. I didn’t discuss that because it makes me insanely proud and incredibly guilty all at the same time. It leaves one feeling conflicted. Is my child growing up too fast because of me?

    In the end, there is no right and there is no wrong. Parenting is a matter of feeling out what fits for each family whether mental illness is present or not.