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music remix
  • Mania, the Remix

    Raise your hand if you love a good remix. Personally, I am all about the remix. My current favorite is the Mike Posner “I Took a Pill in Ibiza” See B remix taking a lovely acoustic song and transforming it into a jam worthy of the finest kitchen dance party one was ever invited to. There are always exceptions to the remix rule and the original holds, such as the current Calvin Harris /Rihanna collaboration “This is What You Came For.” Strictly the original please for my tastes.

    I Took a Pill in Ibiza, remix, Vevo        

    This Is What You Came For, Vevo

    Raise your again if you are wondering what this has to do with mental illness. I assure you plenty. Now I am in the midst of what feels like the Calvin Harris of all remixes – manic episode with mixed features.

    DSM V criteria of a manic episode with mixed features states: “Full criteria are met for a manic episode or hypomanic episode and at least three of the following symptoms are present during the majority of days of the current or most recent episode of mania or hypomania

    -       Prominent dysphoria or depressed mood as indicated by either subjective report or observation made by others.

    -       Diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities (as indicated by either subjective account or observation made by others

    -       Psychomotor retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not just subjective feelings of being slowed down).

    -       Fatigue or loss of energy.

    -       Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being sick).

    -       Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or specific plan for committing suicide.

    The mixed symptoms are observable by others and represent a change from the person’s usual behavior. The mixed symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication other treatment).

    Let’s review (briefly) a manic episode: a distinct period of abnormality and persistently elevated, expansive or irritable mood and abnormally and persistently goal-directed activity or energy, lasting at least one week and present most of the day, nearly every day (or any duration if hospitalization).

    During the period of mood disturbance and increased energy or activity or activity, three (or more) of the following symptoms (four if the mood is only irritable) are present to a significant degree and represent a noticeable change from usual behavior

    -       Inflatable self-esteem or grandiosity

    -       Decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)

    -       More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking

    -       Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing

    -       Distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli), as reported or observed

    -       Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation (i.e., purposeless non-goal-directed activity).

    -       Excessive involvement in activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g.’ engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments).

    The mood disturbance is sufficiently severe to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning or to necessitate hospitalization to prevent harm to self or others, or there are psychotic features.

    The episode is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance or to another medical condition.”

    (Taken directly from the text of the DSM-V, section on bipolar disorders)

    How is my mixed episode playing out? I’ve met the criteria for mania through well over a week now of increased-goal directed activity, less sleep, more talkative, flight of ideas, distractibility and the buying sprees. The mixed component? Decreased mood, thoughts of worthlessness, crying daily, fatigue and thoughts of death.

    I don’t want to have another episode. I wanted to blame my irritable, hateful state on the state of the world today. That is not going to go over well either. People are going to be haters, but my disorder is life-long with periods of relapse and remission. My pdoc is on vacation and the coverage in his office always throws more benzodiazepines at me to solve the problem. That is not what I need. What I need is to lose the fear of speaking up about my mood and getting help with the team I trust the most is unavailable.

    When I changed specialties for my nurse practitioner practice, I guarded my stability and current remission state more carefully than the gold at Fort Knox. I slept, I deceased alcohol consumption, and I took my medications more faithfully than ever before. On a visceral level, I know that this episode is not my fault. I know this episode happened to just occur in spite of the best care possible.

    Here is what frightens me the most about this mixed episode. One, it caught me off guard and I could not recognize it for what it was for several weeks, as I have never experienced one before. Two, I am scared to speak up without my treatment team in town. I am a medical provider and people rely on me. Unless you stand in my shoes, you cannot possible understand what it is like to keep your brain held together for 8 hours every day, in a state of constant adrenaline because patients will always come first and to cause harm would cause you to go to the depths of hell. Three, do I need a medication change – AGAIN?

    Lastly, I fear I will become a victim of the system. I worry my disorder will claim me versus the other way around. I constantly worry about being just another statistic of this brain disease.

    It’s not quite Vegas for this remix and I don’t have a huge crowd cheering me on unlike our dear Calvin, though.